2600-year-old wine press has been uncovered in Lebanon


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One of the treading floors of what’s believed to be the largest Crusader winery found in Mi’ilya, northern Israel.

The site itself was well-preserved, offering a window into the past, showing exactly how the ancient Phoenicians cultivated and traded wine in antiquity.
Archaeologists working in Lebanon discovered a 2,600-year-old winery purportedly constructed and used by the ancient Phoenicians, the greatest wine traders the world has seen, according to National Geographic.

What will now be regarded as the oldest wine press (gat in Hebrew) discovered in Lebanon, dating back to seventh century BCE, was found five miles south of the Lebanese city of Sidon known as Tell el-Burak in Phoenician texts – along with four mud-brick houses.
According to National Geographic, the winemakers would procure grapes from nearby vineyards, bringing them to settle in a basin of “durable plaster” able to hold up to 1,200 gallons of grape juice.
The Phoenicians were not the first to create wine, they were purportedly responsible for spreading wine making throughout the ancient Mediterranean. The merchants would set up vineyards and wineries within the Phoenician colonies across Europe and North Africa, and began gaining fame due to successful trade with Greece and Italy, according to University of Toronto archaeologist Stephen Batiuk.


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